Reduce noise

delete-recycle-bin

I am a big fan of deleting things. Sometimes I go too far. In the past, I’ve deleted things that I’ve needed and not been able to recover them. But I still think it’s the right thing to do.

There’s an article by Ned Batchelder from over 10 years ago, that I still think is relevant today:

If you have a chunk of code you don’t need any more, there’s one big reason to delete it for real rather than leaving it in a disabled state: to reduce noise and uncertainty. Some of the worst enemies a developer has are noise or uncertainty in his code, because they prevent him from working with it effectively in the future.

  • A chunk of code in a disabled state just causes uncertainty. It puts questions in other developers’ minds:
  • Why did the code used to be this way?
  • Why is this new way better?
  • Are we going to switch back to the old way?
  • How will we decide?

You’ll always have a battle on your hands when you try to delete things. People don’t like doing it. It’s similar to trying to throw out physical things (something I also try to do). People just have a natural hoarding instinct. Maybe it dates back to our hunter-gatherer days. After we’ve spent days or months hunting wild bits of code and bringing them back to our cave, it can be difficult to bring ourselves to delete them.

It’s because we remember the effort we put into writing the code the first time. But deleting code is part of writing code. It’s the same with writing prose. As EB White said, “writing is rewriting”. And coding is very similar. In particular I think of William Shrunk’s advice in The Elements of Style:

Omit needless words.

Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

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