Apps and Websites

I have mixed feelings about apps. There’s an XKCD comic that pretty much sums up my experience:

xkcdapps

It’s quite common to come across apps that are just content from the website but in a more limited container. You can’t interact with them as you would with webpage content. Sometimes you can’t copy and paste from them or use  features that have been in webpages as standard for twenty years.

People who are familiar with computers tend to forget that most normal users  are worse with computers than we think. I once told a story about a project to build an appstore at work:

A colleague of mine had to give a presentation about a Corporate iPhone AppStore that we’re building. Half way through, he realised the audience weren’t feeling it, and so said, “Who here knows what an appstore is?” About four people put their hands up.

The excellent web app Forecast.io has a blog that talks about the confusions people get into when trying to pin their webclip to the homescreen:

I’m fairly certain none of them will ever know that Forecast is actually a web app. To them, it’s just an app you install from the web.

Users don’t really understand what they’re doing. Instead they do get frustrated and confused when things don’t behave when they expect. The user who wrote in to Forecast.io was confused that he couldn’t download the web app from the Apple Appstore.

Apps are too much like 1990’s CD-ROMs and not enough like the Web. I feel like I’m always updating my apps. Every time I pick up my phone there’s a little red box next to the Appstore, telling me I have more updates to download.

Perhaps it’s my OCD coming out, but I just can’t leave the updates sitting there. I have to download them all. But if I ever look at the reason for the updates, I see it fixes an issue like “error with Japanese timezone settings for people living in Iceland” or “fixes an issue when you plug an iPhone 1 into a particular model of ten year old HP TV” that I’ll never encounter. Sometimes they change apps so they no longer work in the way I’ve got used to.

It’s probably worth adding: I’m not complaining that they’re fixing problems. Someone in Iceland is probably on Japanese time. And even if they’re not, I’m idealistic enough to think it needs fixing just because it’s wrong. The problem is the nature of apps. I never have to update Amazon.com before I buy a book, or update Facebook before I poke someone. Websites don’t need updating. They are always the latest version.

There are, of course, some good things about apps. Jeff Atwood wrote about how much better the ebay app is than the website. An he’s right. It’s slicker, simpler, easier to use:

Above all else, simplify! But why stop there? If building the mobile and tablet apps first for a web property produces a better user experience – why do we need the website, again?

But maybe the solution here is to build a better website.

Of course, some apps carry out functions on the device, or display static data. And it makes sense for them to be native apps. On my iPhone, I have a torch app (it forces the flash on my camera to remain on), and I have a tube map app (it essentially shows me a picture of the tube map). One of these interacts with the base firmware, so that one has to be a native app. The other displays static data. It would be unnecessary to connect to the Internet to pull the map down every time I want to look at it.

But other apps, like Facebook or LinkedIn are just a native wrapper around the website.

So, what’s the solution?

Of course, there isn’t one. It’s a compromise. At the moment we’re in an era obsessed with native apps. All companies have to have an “app”, if only just to show that they’re up to date.

I was in the pub the other day and accidentally got chatting to someone. He told me that his company had just released an app. “What does it do?” I asked him. “No idea,” he said, “but you’ve got to have an app.” He was the managing director of the company.

Hopefully, when we’ve got over the novelty of the technology, we can start using apps for what they’re good at, rather than just having apps before they are there.

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